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My endeavour throughout has been to supply, in a convenient and comprehensive form, a kind of handbook to the criticism, interpretation and archaeological illustration of the play, which should be interesting and instructive to the student, whether at School or College, and also to some extent useful to the more advanced scholar.

The short introductory essays with which the volume opens, include a sketch of the closing years of the poet, and some account of the points of interest whether in mythology or in art, in dramatic or in textual criticism, which are connected with this, perhaps, his latest work.

Further, I have, as far as possible, gone on the principle of quoting parallel passages in full, instead of contenting myself with a bare reference, considering the former course not only more convenient to the reader, but also fairer in every way, as by this means any argument that rests upon a quotation can at once have its due weight assigned to it,-neither less nor more. A few suggestions of my own, which I venture to submit to the judgment of scholars, will be found in the notes on the following lines: I26, 135, 147, 209, 251, 278, 327, 550, 1002, I008, 1157, I207, I365. of Oxford and Cambridge respectively, for indicating several of the subjects suitable to my purpose, among the treasures of art entrusted to his keeping in the British Museum: and to the Reverend C. King, Senior Fellow of Trinity, for allowing me to consult him on the particular province of ancient art in which he is a recognised master.

Those who have ever had to spend much time in looking up references will, I think, agree with me in holding that few things are more vexatious than to find a particular opinion on a doubtful point supported by an array of references which may or may not be relevant, but all of which have to be tested in detail before any further advance can be made. In the case of one or two of them, it is some slight gratification to find them to a certain extent confirmed by their having independently occurred to others. I am further specially indebted to Messrs George Bell and Sons, the publishers of Mr King's Antique Gemns and RPilngs (1872), for allowing electrotypes to be taken for this book from woodcuts used in that admirable work; eleven of the illustrations (including a gem in the Fitzwilliam Museum, originally engraved for the Syndics of the University Press) are, with the author's kind concurrence, borrowed from the comprehensive series there published.

This may be readily seen by referring to the outline sketched in the previous section. lxvii Had Pentheus put the Chorus into prison, the play would have at once collapsed; and we may fairly allow a position of privilege to so essential a portion of the conventional surroundings of a Greek tragedy. Lastly, at the close of the Second Messenger's speech, in the few sententious lines which, with their didactic moralising, appear to fall rather flat after the swift and energetic account of the catastrophe', we are told that, for mortal men, the highest wisdom is to be found in 'sober sense and awe of things divine.' What are we to make of all this? 135), and thence copied by Scott for a small illustrated edition of Horace published by Bell and Daldy, 1855; the same woodcut has been used in King's Anitique Gems anzd Rings II xxix 9 and in Westropp's Handbook of Archaeologyy, ed. In this gem, which is well accredited, by having been formerly in the Blacas and Strozzi collections, the thyrsus is bound by ribbands near the top, and it therefore occurs to me to suggest that the stick given by Agostini is only an inaccurate rendering of one of the two ribbands in the original, which I have at present been unable to trace. DANCING BACCHANAL, poised on tiptoe, with the left foot thrown back, and balancing on his left shoulder a thyr sus bound with ribbands.

The Choral Odes, unlike those of many other dramas of Euripides, are here, as in a piece of the same date, the Ipfziigez Eia inz Azuis, closely connected with the action of the play. In some respects, it is true, the taste for the picturesque among the Greeks was different from that of modern times; but as regards Euripides in particular, it would be easy to quote not a few passages which, even in a modern poet, would be considered picturesque in an eminent degree (e.g. It is, however, worth while to observe that the most telling touches of description in the Hippolytus, where Phaedra longs for 'the pure draught from the dewy fountain,' for 'rest beneath the black poplar in the leafy meadow,' for 'a ride among the woodland pines or over the sands unwashed by the wave,' are all of them put in the lips of a love-sick woman; and, for all this, she is rudely rebuked by her common 1 W. Dionysus himself, at the end of one of his speeches, calls it a mark of true wisdom to cultivate a sage and easy good-temper (641). The chief point, then, in which our woodcut is different from what we know of the lost work of Scopas is the tossing back of the head and hair, which was characteristic of the latter and is not unrepresented in several of our other illustrations (pp. The original is a sard published in Vidoni's Imipf. The original is a 'Florentine gem' first published in Agostini's Gemmie Antiche Figzrate (I pl. In the cabinet of the British Museum, I have observed a Sardonyx very similar in general design to the above gem, and indeed hardly differing at all, except as regards the position of the overturned wine-vessel. vi includes the Bacchae with the notes of Barnes, Reiske, Musgrave, Heath, Beck, Brunck, Porson and others]; (8) l1altthiae, Leipsig, 18I3-29 [notae in Bacchas in vol.

The balance of the composition requires the speech of Cadmus to be followed by a corresponding speech of Agave. As it is, a few touches suffice to give a clear and vivid impression of the kind of scene intended by him, and all more elaborate details would have been obviously out of place; for of this, as of all the master-pieces of Greek literature, the remark of Lessing holds good, 'that it is the privilege of the ancients never in any matter to do too much or too little' (Laokoon, preface). place nurse, who, reflecting perhaps the ordinary Athenian feeling in such matters, warns her mistress that it would be unsafe to express such longings as these in public, as they would at once be set down to a disordered imagination. \A.~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~' ) \o i: i' ONV Tf HE PURPOSE OF THE PLA Y. Among such indications it has been usual to quote one of the speeches of Teiresias, with its protest against rationalising and philosophising about the gods, and its declaration of acquiescence in the traditions of the popular faith (200 ff). 79, and Part II no 6 in the Official Guide to the Graeco-Roman Sculptures in the B. Foremost of the three figures, here represented as moving onwards in the dance, is a Maenad with her head thrown back and her hair streaming loosely from behind her head, partly clad in a talaric chiton, and beating with her right hand the tympfanum which she holds in her left. Behind her, a mantle flutters in the air, with its upper end caught by the hand that holds the knife. A similar design occurs again and again in ancient reliefs (e.g. 62, none of them exactly corresponds to the above description.

play may have been mutilated in that earlier codex by one who was unconscious of the dramatic purpose of the speeches of Agave and Dionysus. lxxi But, as a whole, it would certainly have been regarded by any Greek tragedian as unsuitable for delivery before an enormous audience, like that which assembled in the theatre of Dionysus; as 'it is impossible for a thousand people at once to be sentimental and tender on the beauties of nature'.' It may also be noticed that Shelley's description, with which the present passage has before now been unfavourably contrasted2, is not true to the facts, as it does not really correspond to the actual scenery on the way to the castle of Petrella, which he had never visited; whereas the few touches of topographical detail given in the above passage are not only beautiful in themselves, but have also the advantage of being in strict accordance with the natural scenery of Cithaeron. xiii.; Cope in Cambridge Essays for I856, 'Onz the taste for theic icttresqzcw among the Greeks'; W. The sober temper is commended (1002), the gentle life extolled (388), and practical good sense preferred to the pretence of superior intelligence. 81), the head and hair correspond to the description given by Callistratus, but the t/zyrsus appears instead of the slain animal. 60) that the Maenad of Scopas may have suggested itself to the artist as a theme appropriate to the completion of the Theatre of Dionysus at Athens in B. In the Official Gzuide it is suggested that the relief was probably inserted as a panel in the base of a candelabrum. A young Faun, who holds a crook in his right hand, is holding up the left in astonishment. The woodcut is borrowed from King's Antique Gems and Rings 11 xxx I2 (also in King and Munro's Horace Odes II xix B). In his left he holds aloft a thyrsus capped with a pine cone, and a little below this a stick cloven at its upper end is tied to the wand by a single ribband. used by Milton]; (4) Joszhua Barnes, Cambridge, 1694; (5) Miusgrave, Oxford, 1778; (6) Beck, Leipsig, 1778-88; (7) Variorum ed., Glasgow, 1821 [vol.

This loss may, of course, have been due to accident alone; a single leaf in the manuscript from which our only copy of the latter half of the play was transcribed, may have been torn out, simply because it was near the close of the volume; but it may also be worth suggestingr that the end of the lxvi AIN7TR OD UCTION. For comparison with the above passage, we can only quote the few following lines: 'High above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines; whose tangled hair Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine.' ONr THE MESSENGERS' SPEE CHES. | ~ nature are probably intended to be characteristic of * the enthusiasm of the votaries of Dionysus, whose favourite haunts are to be found in the woodland solitudes and on the lonely hills (e.g. i ~ ~ 1 1On the general subject of the Greek view of the picturesque in nature, see further, in Ruskin's Modern Painters, part IV, chap. 118-124; and i

The balance of the composition requires the speech of Cadmus to be followed by a corresponding speech of Agave. As it is, a few touches suffice to give a clear and vivid impression of the kind of scene intended by him, and all more elaborate details would have been obviously out of place; for of this, as of all the master-pieces of Greek literature, the remark of Lessing holds good, 'that it is the privilege of the ancients never in any matter to do too much or too little' (Laokoon, preface). place nurse, who, reflecting perhaps the ordinary Athenian feeling in such matters, warns her mistress that it would be unsafe to express such longings as these in public, as they would at once be set down to a disordered imagination. \A.~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~' ) \o i: i' ONV Tf HE PURPOSE OF THE PLA Y. Among such indications it has been usual to quote one of the speeches of Teiresias, with its protest against rationalising and philosophising about the gods, and its declaration of acquiescence in the traditions of the popular faith (200 ff). 79, and Part II no 6 in the Official Guide to the Graeco-Roman Sculptures in the B. Foremost of the three figures, here represented as moving onwards in the dance, is a Maenad with her head thrown back and her hair streaming loosely from behind her head, partly clad in a talaric chiton, and beating with her right hand the tympfanum which she holds in her left. Behind her, a mantle flutters in the air, with its upper end caught by the hand that holds the knife. A similar design occurs again and again in ancient reliefs (e.g. 62, none of them exactly corresponds to the above description. play may have been mutilated in that earlier codex by one who was unconscious of the dramatic purpose of the speeches of Agave and Dionysus. lxxi But, as a whole, it would certainly have been regarded by any Greek tragedian as unsuitable for delivery before an enormous audience, like that which assembled in the theatre of Dionysus; as 'it is impossible for a thousand people at once to be sentimental and tender on the beauties of nature'.' It may also be noticed that Shelley's description, with which the present passage has before now been unfavourably contrasted2, is not true to the facts, as it does not really correspond to the actual scenery on the way to the castle of Petrella, which he had never visited; whereas the few touches of topographical detail given in the above passage are not only beautiful in themselves, but have also the advantage of being in strict accordance with the natural scenery of Cithaeron. xiii.; Cope in Cambridge Essays for I856, 'Onz the taste for theic icttresqzcw among the Greeks'; W. The sober temper is commended (1002), the gentle life extolled (388), and practical good sense preferred to the pretence of superior intelligence. 81), the head and hair correspond to the description given by Callistratus, but the t/zyrsus appears instead of the slain animal. 60) that the Maenad of Scopas may have suggested itself to the artist as a theme appropriate to the completion of the Theatre of Dionysus at Athens in B. In the Official Gzuide it is suggested that the relief was probably inserted as a panel in the base of a candelabrum. A young Faun, who holds a crook in his right hand, is holding up the left in astonishment. The woodcut is borrowed from King's Antique Gems and Rings 11 xxx I2 (also in King and Munro's Horace Odes II xix B). In his left he holds aloft a thyrsus capped with a pine cone, and a little below this a stick cloven at its upper end is tied to the wand by a single ribband. used by Milton]; (4) Joszhua Barnes, Cambridge, 1694; (5) Miusgrave, Oxford, 1778; (6) Beck, Leipsig, 1778-88; (7) Variorum ed., Glasgow, 1821 [vol. This loss may, of course, have been due to accident alone; a single leaf in the manuscript from which our only copy of the latter half of the play was transcribed, may have been torn out, simply because it was near the close of the volume; but it may also be worth suggestingr that the end of the lxvi AIN7TR OD UCTION. For comparison with the above passage, we can only quote the few following lines: 'High above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines; whose tangled hair Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine.' ONr THE MESSENGERS' SPEE CHES. | ~ nature are probably intended to be characteristic of * the enthusiasm of the votaries of Dionysus, whose favourite haunts are to be found in the woodland solitudes and on the lonely hills (e.g. i ~ ~ 1 1On the general subject of the Greek view of the picturesque in nature, see further, in Ruskin's Modern Painters, part IV, chap. 118-124; and i [[

The balance of the composition requires the speech of Cadmus to be followed by a corresponding speech of Agave. As it is, a few touches suffice to give a clear and vivid impression of the kind of scene intended by him, and all more elaborate details would have been obviously out of place; for of this, as of all the master-pieces of Greek literature, the remark of Lessing holds good, 'that it is the privilege of the ancients never in any matter to do too much or too little' (Laokoon, preface). place nurse, who, reflecting perhaps the ordinary Athenian feeling in such matters, warns her mistress that it would be unsafe to express such longings as these in public, as they would at once be set down to a disordered imagination. \A.~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~' ) \o i: i' ONV Tf HE PURPOSE OF THE PLA Y. Among such indications it has been usual to quote one of the speeches of Teiresias, with its protest against rationalising and philosophising about the gods, and its declaration of acquiescence in the traditions of the popular faith (200 ff). 79, and Part II no 6 in the Official Guide to the Graeco-Roman Sculptures in the B. Foremost of the three figures, here represented as moving onwards in the dance, is a Maenad with her head thrown back and her hair streaming loosely from behind her head, partly clad in a talaric chiton, and beating with her right hand the tympfanum which she holds in her left. Behind her, a mantle flutters in the air, with its upper end caught by the hand that holds the knife. A similar design occurs again and again in ancient reliefs (e.g. 62, none of them exactly corresponds to the above description.

play may have been mutilated in that earlier codex by one who was unconscious of the dramatic purpose of the speeches of Agave and Dionysus. lxxi But, as a whole, it would certainly have been regarded by any Greek tragedian as unsuitable for delivery before an enormous audience, like that which assembled in the theatre of Dionysus; as 'it is impossible for a thousand people at once to be sentimental and tender on the beauties of nature'.' It may also be noticed that Shelley's description, with which the present passage has before now been unfavourably contrasted2, is not true to the facts, as it does not really correspond to the actual scenery on the way to the castle of Petrella, which he had never visited; whereas the few touches of topographical detail given in the above passage are not only beautiful in themselves, but have also the advantage of being in strict accordance with the natural scenery of Cithaeron. xiii.; Cope in Cambridge Essays for I856, 'Onz the taste for theic icttresqzcw among the Greeks'; W. The sober temper is commended (1002), the gentle life extolled (388), and practical good sense preferred to the pretence of superior intelligence. 81), the head and hair correspond to the description given by Callistratus, but the t/zyrsus appears instead of the slain animal. 60) that the Maenad of Scopas may have suggested itself to the artist as a theme appropriate to the completion of the Theatre of Dionysus at Athens in B. In the Official Gzuide it is suggested that the relief was probably inserted as a panel in the base of a candelabrum. A young Faun, who holds a crook in his right hand, is holding up the left in astonishment. The woodcut is borrowed from King's Antique Gems and Rings 11 xxx I2 (also in King and Munro's Horace Odes II xix B). In his left he holds aloft a thyrsus capped with a pine cone, and a little below this a stick cloven at its upper end is tied to the wand by a single ribband. used by Milton]; (4) Joszhua Barnes, Cambridge, 1694; (5) Miusgrave, Oxford, 1778; (6) Beck, Leipsig, 1778-88; (7) Variorum ed., Glasgow, 1821 [vol.

This loss may, of course, have been due to accident alone; a single leaf in the manuscript from which our only copy of the latter half of the play was transcribed, may have been torn out, simply because it was near the close of the volume; but it may also be worth suggestingr that the end of the lxvi AIN7TR OD UCTION. For comparison with the above passage, we can only quote the few following lines: 'High above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines; whose tangled hair Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine.' ONr THE MESSENGERS' SPEE CHES. | ~ nature are probably intended to be characteristic of * the enthusiasm of the votaries of Dionysus, whose favourite haunts are to be found in the woodland solitudes and on the lonely hills (e.g. i ~ ~ 1 1On the general subject of the Greek view of the picturesque in nature, see further, in Ruskin's Modern Painters, part IV, chap. 118-124; and i \0Ti; Woermann, Uebcr deln landschaftlichen Aatursinn der Griechcen nmd Riomer, Miinchen, 1871, pp. The chorus in Greek tragedy is, again and again, the interpreter to the audience of the inner meaning of the action of the play; and the moral reflexions which are to be found in the lyrical portions of the Bacchae seem in several instances to be all the more likely to be meant to express the poet's own opinions, when we observe that they are not entirely in keeping S. We are told, for example, that 'to be knowing is not to be wise'; that, in other words, it is folly to be wise in one's own conceit (395); that the true wisdom consists in holding aloof from those who set themselves up to be wiser than their fellows, and in acquiescing contentedly in the common sense of ordinary men (427). The most memorable instance of the same subject is the masterpiece of Scopas which is the theme of several epigrams of the Greek Anthology (Alnth. On the other hand, in a relief formerly in the Borghese collection (Winckelmann, no. He elsewhere recognises a fresh development of Greek art under the influence of Tragedy, a development which shewed itself not only in the groups of that sculptor but also in single figures like that of his Maenad (p. The height of the original is I foot, 5 inches; the woodcut is copied from the engraving in the British i Museum Marbles x plate 35. She is seated under a tree and has just opened the sacred basket, out of which a snake is seen emerging. DANCING FAUN, with head tossed back and hair floating in the breeze, bunches of grapes in his right hand, and a panther's skin over his right arm. with Latin translation by Aemilius Portus, Heidelberg, I597; (3) Paul Stephens, Geneva, 1602 [the ed. I855 [2 vols., with full ayparatus criticus at the end of each volume]; (II) A. I867 [3 vols., with a few of the more important various readings and emendations at the foot of the page]; (12) Nauck ed. with introduction 'de Euripidis vita' &c., and 'annotatio critica']; (I3) 1W.

As a matter of fact, few people take the trouble; and those who do, find themselves often discouraged by their experience from continuing to make the attempt.-It may be added that the short pieces of translation occasionally given in the notes are, in the case of the dialogue of the play, extracted from a rendering of that portion in blank verse, which I prepared for my use in the lecture-room. I have endeavoured throughout to devote particular attention to points of archaeological interest and especially to the illustration of the play with the help of monuments of ancient art. The remaining twentyone have been prepared expressly for this volume by Mr F.

In the explanatory notes, a number of adversaria by R. Under the new scheme for the Classical Tripos, one of the special subjects in which students will be able henceforth to obtain distinction, after taking honours in pure scholarship, is Classical Archaeology, including ancient art and mythology, with certain prescribed portions of the wide province of topography and antiquities; and provision is already being made by Professorial and other teaching for the due instruction of students vi PREF v A CE. Thus any Cambridge scholar who in future years undertakes a work similar to the present will happily be able to start with the advantage of a systematic study of ancient art which has only to a limited extent fallen to the lot of the present editor. Anderson, the skilful artist and engraver engaged in the establishment of Messrs R. A full description has been given, not only of all the thirty-two illustrations here selected (with an indication in each instance of the source from which it is derived); but also of other works of art connected with the play, which though not included in this selection, nevertheless deserve particular attention for their archaeological interest.

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The balance of the composition requires the speech of Cadmus to be followed by a corresponding speech of Agave. As it is, a few touches suffice to give a clear and vivid impression of the kind of scene intended by him, and all more elaborate details would have been obviously out of place; for of this, as of all the master-pieces of Greek literature, the remark of Lessing holds good, 'that it is the privilege of the ancients never in any matter to do too much or too little' (Laokoon, preface). place nurse, who, reflecting perhaps the ordinary Athenian feeling in such matters, warns her mistress that it would be unsafe to express such longings as these in public, as they would at once be set down to a disordered imagination. \A.~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~' ) \o i: i' ONV Tf HE PURPOSE OF THE PLA Y. Among such indications it has been usual to quote one of the speeches of Teiresias, with its protest against rationalising and philosophising about the gods, and its declaration of acquiescence in the traditions of the popular faith (200 ff). 79, and Part II no 6 in the Official Guide to the Graeco-Roman Sculptures in the B. Foremost of the three figures, here represented as moving onwards in the dance, is a Maenad with her head thrown back and her hair streaming loosely from behind her head, partly clad in a talaric chiton, and beating with her right hand the tympfanum which she holds in her left. Behind her, a mantle flutters in the air, with its upper end caught by the hand that holds the knife. A similar design occurs again and again in ancient reliefs (e.g. 62, none of them exactly corresponds to the above description. play may have been mutilated in that earlier codex by one who was unconscious of the dramatic purpose of the speeches of Agave and Dionysus. lxxi But, as a whole, it would certainly have been regarded by any Greek tragedian as unsuitable for delivery before an enormous audience, like that which assembled in the theatre of Dionysus; as 'it is impossible for a thousand people at once to be sentimental and tender on the beauties of nature'.' It may also be noticed that Shelley's description, with which the present passage has before now been unfavourably contrasted2, is not true to the facts, as it does not really correspond to the actual scenery on the way to the castle of Petrella, which he had never visited; whereas the few touches of topographical detail given in the above passage are not only beautiful in themselves, but have also the advantage of being in strict accordance with the natural scenery of Cithaeron. xiii.; Cope in Cambridge Essays for I856, 'Onz the taste for theic icttresqzcw among the Greeks'; W. The sober temper is commended (1002), the gentle life extolled (388), and practical good sense preferred to the pretence of superior intelligence. 81), the head and hair correspond to the description given by Callistratus, but the t/zyrsus appears instead of the slain animal. 60) that the Maenad of Scopas may have suggested itself to the artist as a theme appropriate to the completion of the Theatre of Dionysus at Athens in B. In the Official Gzuide it is suggested that the relief was probably inserted as a panel in the base of a candelabrum. A young Faun, who holds a crook in his right hand, is holding up the left in astonishment. The woodcut is borrowed from King's Antique Gems and Rings 11 xxx I2 (also in King and Munro's Horace Odes II xix B). In his left he holds aloft a thyrsus capped with a pine cone, and a little below this a stick cloven at its upper end is tied to the wand by a single ribband. used by Milton]; (4) Joszhua Barnes, Cambridge, 1694; (5) Miusgrave, Oxford, 1778; (6) Beck, Leipsig, 1778-88; (7) Variorum ed., Glasgow, 1821 [vol. This loss may, of course, have been due to accident alone; a single leaf in the manuscript from which our only copy of the latter half of the play was transcribed, may have been torn out, simply because it was near the close of the volume; but it may also be worth suggestingr that the end of the lxvi AIN7TR OD UCTION. For comparison with the above passage, we can only quote the few following lines: 'High above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines; whose tangled hair Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine.' ONr THE MESSENGERS' SPEE CHES. | ~ nature are probably intended to be characteristic of * the enthusiasm of the votaries of Dionysus, whose favourite haunts are to be found in the woodland solitudes and on the lonely hills (e.g. i ~ ~ 1 1On the general subject of the Greek view of the picturesque in nature, see further, in Ruskin's Modern Painters, part IV, chap. 118-124; and i \0Ti; Woermann, Uebcr deln landschaftlichen Aatursinn der Griechcen nmd Riomer, Miinchen, 1871, pp. The chorus in Greek tragedy is, again and again, the interpreter to the audience of the inner meaning of the action of the play; and the moral reflexions which are to be found in the lyrical portions of the Bacchae seem in several instances to be all the more likely to be meant to express the poet's own opinions, when we observe that they are not entirely in keeping S. We are told, for example, that 'to be knowing is not to be wise'; that, in other words, it is folly to be wise in one's own conceit (395); that the true wisdom consists in holding aloof from those who set themselves up to be wiser than their fellows, and in acquiescing contentedly in the common sense of ordinary men (427). The most memorable instance of the same subject is the masterpiece of Scopas which is the theme of several epigrams of the Greek Anthology (Alnth. On the other hand, in a relief formerly in the Borghese collection (Winckelmann, no. He elsewhere recognises a fresh development of Greek art under the influence of Tragedy, a development which shewed itself not only in the groups of that sculptor but also in single figures like that of his Maenad (p. The height of the original is I foot, 5 inches; the woodcut is copied from the engraving in the British i Museum Marbles x plate 35. She is seated under a tree and has just opened the sacred basket, out of which a snake is seen emerging. DANCING FAUN, with head tossed back and hair floating in the breeze, bunches of grapes in his right hand, and a panther's skin over his right arm. with Latin translation by Aemilius Portus, Heidelberg, I597; (3) Paul Stephens, Geneva, 1602 [the ed. I855 [2 vols., with full ayparatus criticus at the end of each volume]; (II) A. I867 [3 vols., with a few of the more important various readings and emendations at the foot of the page]; (12) Nauck ed. with introduction 'de Euripidis vita' &c., and 'annotatio critica']; (I3) 1W. As a matter of fact, few people take the trouble; and those who do, find themselves often discouraged by their experience from continuing to make the attempt.-It may be added that the short pieces of translation occasionally given in the notes are, in the case of the dialogue of the play, extracted from a rendering of that portion in blank verse, which I prepared for my use in the lecture-room. I have endeavoured throughout to devote particular attention to points of archaeological interest and especially to the illustration of the play with the help of monuments of ancient art. The remaining twentyone have been prepared expressly for this volume by Mr F. In the explanatory notes, a number of adversaria by R. Under the new scheme for the Classical Tripos, one of the special subjects in which students will be able henceforth to obtain distinction, after taking honours in pure scholarship, is Classical Archaeology, including ancient art and mythology, with certain prescribed portions of the wide province of topography and antiquities; and provision is already being made by Professorial and other teaching for the due instruction of students vi PREF v A CE. Thus any Cambridge scholar who in future years undertakes a work similar to the present will happily be able to start with the advantage of a systematic study of ancient art which has only to a limited extent fallen to the lot of the present editor. Anderson, the skilful artist and engraver engaged in the establishment of Messrs R. A full description has been given, not only of all the thirty-two illustrations here selected (with an indication in each instance of the source from which it is derived); but also of other works of art connected with the play, which though not included in this selection, nevertheless deserve particular attention for their archaeological interest.

]]Ti; Woermann, Uebcr deln landschaftlichen Aatursinn der Griechcen nmd Riomer, Miinchen, 1871, pp. The chorus in Greek tragedy is, again and again, the interpreter to the audience of the inner meaning of the action of the play; and the moral reflexions which are to be found in the lyrical portions of the Bacchae seem in several instances to be all the more likely to be meant to express the poet's own opinions, when we observe that they are not entirely in keeping S. We are told, for example, that 'to be knowing is not to be wise'; that, in other words, it is folly to be wise in one's own conceit (395); that the true wisdom consists in holding aloof from those who set themselves up to be wiser than their fellows, and in acquiescing contentedly in the common sense of ordinary men (427). The most memorable instance of the same subject is the masterpiece of Scopas which is the theme of several epigrams of the Greek Anthology (Alnth. On the other hand, in a relief formerly in the Borghese collection (Winckelmann, no. He elsewhere recognises a fresh development of Greek art under the influence of Tragedy, a development which shewed itself not only in the groups of that sculptor but also in single figures like that of his Maenad (p. The height of the original is I foot, 5 inches; the woodcut is copied from the engraving in the British i Museum Marbles x plate 35. She is seated under a tree and has just opened the sacred basket, out of which a snake is seen emerging. DANCING FAUN, with head tossed back and hair floating in the breeze, bunches of grapes in his right hand, and a panther's skin over his right arm. with Latin translation by Aemilius Portus, Heidelberg, I597; (3) Paul Stephens, Geneva, 1602 [the ed. I855 [2 vols., with full ayparatus criticus at the end of each volume]; (II) A. I867 [3 vols., with a few of the more important various readings and emendations at the foot of the page]; (12) Nauck ed. with introduction 'de Euripidis vita' &c., and 'annotatio critica']; (I3) 1W. As a matter of fact, few people take the trouble; and those who do, find themselves often discouraged by their experience from continuing to make the attempt.-It may be added that the short pieces of translation occasionally given in the notes are, in the case of the dialogue of the play, extracted from a rendering of that portion in blank verse, which I prepared for my use in the lecture-room. I have endeavoured throughout to devote particular attention to points of archaeological interest and especially to the illustration of the play with the help of monuments of ancient art. The remaining twentyone have been prepared expressly for this volume by Mr F. In the explanatory notes, a number of adversaria by R. Under the new scheme for the Classical Tripos, one of the special subjects in which students will be able henceforth to obtain distinction, after taking honours in pure scholarship, is Classical Archaeology, including ancient art and mythology, with certain prescribed portions of the wide province of topography and antiquities; and provision is already being made by Professorial and other teaching for the due instruction of students vi PREF v A CE. Thus any Cambridge scholar who in future years undertakes a work similar to the present will happily be able to start with the advantage of a systematic study of ancient art which has only to a limited extent fallen to the lot of the present editor. Anderson, the skilful artist and engraver engaged in the establishment of Messrs R. A full description has been given, not only of all the thirty-two illustrations here selected (with an indication in each instance of the source from which it is derived); but also of other works of art connected with the play, which though not included in this selection, nevertheless deserve particular attention for their archaeological interest.

Ti; Woermann, Uebcr deln landschaftlichen Aatursinn der Griechcen nmd Riomer, Miinchen, 1871, pp. The chorus in Greek tragedy is, again and again, the interpreter to the audience of the inner meaning of the action of the play; and the moral reflexions which are to be found in the lyrical portions of the Bacchae seem in several instances to be all the more likely to be meant to express the poet's own opinions, when we observe that they are not entirely in keeping S. We are told, for example, that 'to be knowing is not to be wise'; that, in other words, it is folly to be wise in one's own conceit (395); that the true wisdom consists in holding aloof from those who set themselves up to be wiser than their fellows, and in acquiescing contentedly in the common sense of ordinary men (427). The most memorable instance of the same subject is the masterpiece of Scopas which is the theme of several epigrams of the Greek Anthology (Alnth. On the other hand, in a relief formerly in the Borghese collection (Winckelmann, no. He elsewhere recognises a fresh development of Greek art under the influence of Tragedy, a development which shewed itself not only in the groups of that sculptor but also in single figures like that of his Maenad (p. The height of the original is I foot, 5 inches; the woodcut is copied from the engraving in the British i Museum Marbles x plate 35. She is seated under a tree and has just opened the sacred basket, out of which a snake is seen emerging. DANCING FAUN, with head tossed back and hair floating in the breeze, bunches of grapes in his right hand, and a panther's skin over his right arm. with Latin translation by Aemilius Portus, Heidelberg, I597; (3) Paul Stephens, Geneva, 1602 [the ed. I855 [2 vols., with full ayparatus criticus at the end of each volume]; (II) A. I867 [3 vols., with a few of the more important various readings and emendations at the foot of the page]; (12) Nauck ed. with introduction 'de Euripidis vita' &c., and 'annotatio critica']; (I3) 1W.

As a matter of fact, few people take the trouble; and those who do, find themselves often discouraged by their experience from continuing to make the attempt.-It may be added that the short pieces of translation occasionally given in the notes are, in the case of the dialogue of the play, extracted from a rendering of that portion in blank verse, which I prepared for my use in the lecture-room. I have endeavoured throughout to devote particular attention to points of archaeological interest and especially to the illustration of the play with the help of monuments of ancient art. The remaining twentyone have been prepared expressly for this volume by Mr F.

In the explanatory notes, a number of adversaria by R. Under the new scheme for the Classical Tripos, one of the special subjects in which students will be able henceforth to obtain distinction, after taking honours in pure scholarship, is Classical Archaeology, including ancient art and mythology, with certain prescribed portions of the wide province of topography and antiquities; and provision is already being made by Professorial and other teaching for the due instruction of students vi PREF v A CE. Thus any Cambridge scholar who in future years undertakes a work similar to the present will happily be able to start with the advantage of a systematic study of ancient art which has only to a limited extent fallen to the lot of the present editor. Anderson, the skilful artist and engraver engaged in the establishment of Messrs R. A full description has been given, not only of all the thirty-two illustrations here selected (with an indication in each instance of the source from which it is derived); but also of other works of art connected with the play, which though not included in this selection, nevertheless deserve particular attention for their archaeological interest.

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