Nigerian dating scams on facebook

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To date there have been no reports to Army CID indicating any U. service members have suffered any financial loss as a result of these attacks. • If you do start an internet-based relationship with someone, check them out, research what they are telling you with someone who would know, such as a current or former service member.• Be very suspicious if you never get to actually speak with the person on the phone or are told you cannot write or receive letters in the mail.As of March, there were 9,146 Nigerians on student visas in Malaysia, the education ministry said, out of 123,000 overseas students in total."Once in the country as students, there's very little effort to verify their studies," Scherer said.Often times the company exists, but has no idea or is not a part of the scam.• Be aware of common spelling, grammatical or language errors in the emails."We've even seen where the crooks said that the Army won't allow the Soldier to access their personal bank accounts or credit cards," said Grey. "These perpetrators, often from other countries, most notably from West African countries, are good at what they do and quite familiar with American culture, but the claims about the Army and its regulations are ridiculous," said Grey. The ability of law enforcement to identify these perpetrators is very limited, so CID officials said individuals must stay on the alert and be personally responsible to protect themselves.

The scams include asking the victim to send money, often thousands of dollars at a time, to a third party address.The victims are most often unsuspecting women, 30 to 55 years old, who think they are romantically involved on the Internet with an American Soldier, when in fact they are being cyber-robbed by perpetrators thousands of miles away. The perpetrators will often take the true rank and name of a U. Soldier who is honorably serving his country somewhere in the world, marry that up with some photographs of a Soldier off the Internet, and then build a false identity to begin prowling the Internet for victims."We cannot stress enough that people need to stop sending money to persons they meet on the Internet and claim to be in the U. military," said Chris Grey, Army CID's spokesman. "We have even seen instances where the Soldier was killed in action and the crooks have used that hero's identity to perpetrate their twisted scam," said CID Special Agent Russel Graves, who has been fielding the hundreds of calls and emails from victims for months.WHERE TO GO FOR HELP Report the theft to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (FBI-NW3C Partnership) at Report the theft to the Federal Trade Commission at

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